Posts tagged "Child Custody"

Put your child's interests first when divorcing in Indiana

Divorce is hard for all Indiana residents, but when there are children involved, the parents and others invested in the child's care and well-being cannot be distracted from the primary focus: the well-being of the child. Divorce issues will be complex and can cause seemingly endless disputes. That is true for property division and spousal support. When child custody is an issue, it can make an already fractured relationship worse. Having legal advice to address child custody and visitation issues is one of the most important decisions that both parents can make.

Is parallel parenting an option in my child custody case?

Child custody and crafting a parenting plan that satisfies all parties and adheres to the child's best interests in Indiana can be difficult. There are often alternatives that are used to satisfy the situation in as seamless a manner as possible. While most cases will have a custodial parent and a noncustodial parent with visitation time granted to the noncustodial parent, one option that could be effective in certain cases is parallel parenting.

Understanding child custody and scheduled changes to visitation

It is understandable when there is a child custody and visitation agreement between Indiana parents who have divorced and circumstances arise where changes need to be made. For those whose relationship is cordial or even friendly, this is rarely a problem. For others, however, when there was a contentious child custody battle and the parenting time is constantly in dispute, it is important to fall back onto how the law addresses these matters. A law firm that has experience in all aspects of family law can help.

What does Indiana law say about child custody and relocation?

Indiana parents who have gotten a divorce and have children will undoubtedly want the best for them. When there is a child custody agreement, the noncustodial parent will generally have visitation rights. In a best-case scenario, the parents will be amicable and able to talk cordially to one another regarding issues with the child. Even if that is not the case, the agreement is meant to ensure both parents have sufficient time with the child and act in his or her best interests.

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